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Tuesday, 11 February 2014 00:00

SAFETY MEETING PLANNER & AGENDA

INSTALLING & USING TIRE CHAINS CORRECTLY

Meeting Leader:

  • Prepare in advance to make this meeting effective. Click HERE for a link to instructions on how to best use this information.
  • Print and read over this entire agenda (or download a PDF version here).
  • Think about how you want to lead the meeting.
  • Is there anything that is specific to your company or operation that you can include to personalize the information?
  • Review the video for this session.
  • Save the link to the video in your favourite folder on your browser for easy access.
  • Open and then minimize the viewer just before the meeting to make the video introduction smooth.

Video Template - Chains

NOT A SUBSCRIBER YET?  You will see a watermarked sample.  Get the 'clean' video for your meeting now by clicking here to get the order form and fax/email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .  We will send you a link to the non-watermarked video.

START YOUR MEETING!

Opening Statement:

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If you drive in northern or high altitude areas with extreme winter conditions, you may use traction devices like tire chains to assist with control in winter but if you are not sure how to install them or drive with chains installed, you could be in for frustration and possibly vehicle damage or worse!

Questions for this Meeting:

Q: How many people here have used tire chains?

Discuss

Tire chains have been around for many years and are still a great choice to add a massive amount of traction in difficult conditions.

Many people have chains in their vehicle in winter but have not yet needed them and therefore have never installed them.

Q: When is the best time to learn how to install chains?

The best time to install chains on your vehicle, the first time, is BEFORE you need them.  If you have a heated or at least dry garage or underground parking area to practise, this is best.

Tailgate Tips:

  • The video that we will watch shortly, shows a common and popular style of light duty truck or car chains but yours could be different.
  • Read the instructions first and follow them carefully to avoid vehicle damage or injury.
  • When installing on the roadside, wear a reflective vest.
  • Install the chains on the drive axle tires, on an all-wheel drive or four-wheel drive, install on the rear axle.
  • The first steps are to lay out the chains and depending on the type,pass them behind the tire and then connect them at the top or lay them out in front of the tire and drive forward onto the chain before pulling up both ends and connecting at the top.
  • It's important to ensure that the chains are snug on the tire tread and the elastic straps crossing in front of the wheel are also snug.
  • After installing the chains it's a good idea to check the tension after driving a short distance.
  • What is the maximum safe speed to drive with chains installed?  50 km/h or 30 mph is the maximum safe speed.R-047
  • If you are headed into the mountains and the roads are snowy and slick, before you approach a hill, install the chains in a safe area before you get stuck.  Many highways provide a 'chaining up' area.  Use this area and avoid the hazard of being stuck on a hill in a traveling lane trying to stay safe while installing your chains.  Always wear a safety vest to be seen as you work.
  • Remember to take the chains off in a safe area as soon as you are back on clear pavement to avoid damage to your vehicle, the chains and the roads.
  • Once your trip is over, take the time to clean and dry the chains, inspect them, then spray them with an anti-rust coating and re-pack them to be ready for the next time that you need them.winter_car_kit
  • Always carry an emergency winter survival kit including a flashlight with extra batteries, a cell phone, blankets, water, snacks, gloves, boots, first aid kit, ice scraper, jumper cables, extra windshield washer fluid, a reflective vest and reflective markers or flares.

Summary:

  • Learn to install your chains in advance and practise to ensure that you can do this in difficult conditions.
  • Choose a safe place to install and remove the chains.
  • Wear a safety vest while working outside the vehicle.
  • Check for tension after driving a short distance.
  • Keep your speed below 50 km/h or 30 mph.
  • Clean and store chains properly after use.

Practical Challenge:

If your vehicles have tire chains, install them on a vehicle now as a team.

Download a PDF version, of this meeting planner, HERE!

Monday, 17 March 2014 00:00

SAFETY MEETING PLANNER & AGENDA

KEEP YOUR WINDSHIELD & MIRRORS CLEAN!

Meeting Leader:

  • Prepare in advance to make this meeting effective. Click HERE for a link to instructions on how to best use this information.
  • Print and read over this entire agenda (or download a PDF version here).
  • Think about how you want to lead the meeting.
  • Is there anything that is specific to your company or operation that you can include to personalize the information?
  • Review the video for this session.
  • Save the link to the video in your favourite folder on your browser for easy access.
  • Open and then minimize the viewer just before the meeting to make the video introduction smooth.

Video #32 Template

  • NOT A SUBSCRIBER YET?  You will see a watermarked sample.  Get the ‘clean’ video for your meeting now by clicking here to get the order form and fax/email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..  We will send you a link to the non-watermarked video.

START YOUR MEETING!

Opening Statement:

dirty-windshield-car-rally-13617933

Your eyes are your first line of defense, but if your vision is obstructed by poor visibility through your windshield or mirrors, you are facing a serious handicap to defensive driving.

The Questions for this Meeting:

Q: What can cause problems with vision through the windshield or mirrors?

Answers can be:

  • Dirt on the outside of the windshield or on the mirror.
  • Snow, ice or frost on the outside (and/or inside) of the windshield or on the mirrors.
  • Condensation
  • Smudging from wiping with a dirty cloth or hands inside (this can cause real problems with glare when the sun is low on the horizon).
  • Cracks in the windshield or mirror (or broken pieces missing from a mirror).
  • Poorly adjusted mirrors.
  • Can you think of others?

car-rental-windshield-crack

If you can’t see properly, you will not be able to avoid problems, so when you do your walk around, circle check or pre-trip inspection, make sure to check the windshield and mirrors.

Tailgate Tips:

  1. If it’s cold, warm the vehicle to thaw the windshield and melt the ice or snow.
  2. Remove any excess snow with a brush or broom (keep one handy in the vehicle).
  3. Use a squeegee on the outside windows when fueling up to keep them clean.  While you are at it, clean your headlights and turn signal lenses.
  4. Periodically wash the inside of the windshield to remove dust, dirt and smudging.windshield-washer-liquid
  5. Keep your windshield washer reservoir full and either top it up regularly or keep a spare jug in the vehicle.  This is really important in winter when road spray from the melting snow can require frequent use.
  6. Clean and adjust your mirrors so that the blind spots are minimized.  (You should only see the side of your own vehicle in them if you tilt your head a bit to the side.)

If you can’t see the hazard, you will not be able to deal with it.  Give yourself the best chance to avoid the other guy by keeping your windshield and mirrors in great shape!

Introduce the Video:

Spencer McDonald discusses the importance of keeping optimum vision with a clean windshield and adjusted mirrors.

Practical Challenge:

Have everyone check and clean the windshield and mirrors of their vehicle NOW.  Provide paper towels and glass cleaner – now there is no excuse!

Download a PDF version, of this meeting planner, HERE!

Monday, 07 April 2014 00:00

SAFETY MEETING PLANNER AND AGENDA

CHECK YOUR TIRES!

Meeting Leader:

  • Prepare in advance to make this meeting effective.  Click HERE for a link to instructions on how to best use this information.
  • Print and read over this entire agenda (or download a PDF version here).
  • Think about how you want to lead the meeting.
  • Is there anything that is specific to your company or operation that you can include to personalize the information?
  • Review the video for this session.

Video Template

  • Save the link to the video in your favourites folder on your browser for easy access.
  • Open and then minimize the viewer just before the meeting to make the video introduction smooth.

START YOUR MEETING!

Opening Statement:

tire pressure

The only thing that keeps you on the road is your tires so their condition is critical to safety.  You should check them regularly.

 

Questions for this Meeting:

Q: When you check your tires, what should you look for/check?

tireinflation

Answers can be:

  • Tread depth and condition: there are ‘wear markers’ that will show when your tire is worn to the point of needing replacement.
  • Check for damage or foreign material/objects: cuts in the tread or sidewall, imbedded rocks, metal or other sharp objects.
  • Ensure that you are using the right type of tire for your application.  If off highway use is intended, you should look for the ‘M & S’ mark for mud and snow.  For winter use, dedicated snow tires will have the snowflake symbol moulded into the sidewall.
  • Tire pressure
  • Can you think of others?

Q: Who know where to look to find out the correct tire pressure?

Tailgate Tip:

accurate-tire-pressure-gauge

First of all, you can’t tell if your tire is correctly inflated just by looking at it.  If your tire looks low, it is already dangerously underinflated.  You have to put a gauge on the valve stem and actually measure the pressure.

Many people think that the pressure on the tire sidewall is the right pressure to inflate the tire to.  This is not correct!  The tire sidewall will indicate the maximum safe inflation and weight carrying capacity for the tire and it’s a good thing to know and compare to the tire specification for your vehicle.  It is not uncommon for budget minded purchasers to install cheaper tires that are not rated for a high enough load capacity.  (You can buy a load range ‘B’ or ‘E’ tire of the same size but the ‘E’ is heavier duty and will be rated at a higher load capacity and maximum inflation).

ctTire1

The vehicle manufacturer determines what the right tire size and pressure should be based on the vehicle weight and intended use including load capacity (GVW) this information will be noted on the driver door or door frame or in the glove box or in the operator manual.  This is the pressure that you should inflate to.  Putting too much or too little air in the tire will affect the contact patch and traction that the tire is able to generate.

Introduce the Video:

Spencer McDonald discusses the importance of tire inspections including: tire pressure check, inspection for wear and damage during pre-trip inspections (to reduce the incident frequency) and improve safety performance.  Correct tire selection for application is also highlighted.

Practical Challenge:

July-18-Air-temp-affect-pressure

If you have a tire to bring into the shop or classroom/meeting room, have everyone find the markings that identify maximum pressure and load range, capacity, etc.

Take your group out and inspect the tires on everyone’s vehicle including tire pressure.  Ask each person to find the vehicle sticker that notes correct pressure.

Discuss the findings and variation found in tire pressures.

Then correct the inflation of everyone’s tires if necessary!

Have a safe day!

Download a PDF version, of the is meeting planner, HERE!

line

NOT A SUBSCRIBER YET?  You will see a watermarked sample of the video.  Get the ‘clean’ video for your meeting now by clicking here to get the order form and fax/email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..  We will send you a link to the non-watermarked video.

Friday, 13 June 2014 00:00

SAFETY MEETING PLANNER & AGENDA

Meeting Planner:

  • Prepare in advance to make this meeting effective.  Click HERE for a link to instructions on how to best use this information.
  • Print and read over this entire agenda (or download a PDF version here).
  • Think about how you want to lead the meeting.
  • Is there anything that is specific to your company or operation that you can include to personalize the information?
  • Review the video for this session.
  • Save the link to the video in your ‘Favorites’ folder on your browser for easy access.
  • Open and then minimize the viewer just before the meeting to make the video introduction smooth.

Video Template

START YOUR MEETING!

Opening Statement:

Pretty much all rear end collisions can be prevented by maintaining a safe following distance from the vehicle in front of you.

Questions for this Meeting:

Q: What is a safe following distance and how can you check that you are leaving enough room?

Answer:

The only way to accurately check your following distance is by using the ‘time interval formula’ which works by picking a fixed landmark like a sign or some other stationary object and counting seconds as the vehicle in front of you passes it.  The number of seconds that you count is your time interval.

Under the best conditions, the minimum number of seconds needs to be 2 and more as conditions change or deteriorate.

Q: Why is this so important?

Answer:

Stopping distance is a combination of reaction distance and braking distance.  Reaction distance is the distance that your vehicle travels from the time you see a reason to apply brakes to when you actually move your foot to the brake pedal and begin to slow down.  If you are too close to the vehicle in front, you will hit them NO MATTER HOW GOOD A DRIVER YOU ARE because you can only get to the brake as fast as a human can move and by the time you get there, if the guy in front is already braking hard, you don’t stand a chance.

Q: What are some conditions that would require an increase in following distance?

Answer:

  • Weather condition: like rain, snow or other weather problems.
  • Road condition: such as gravel or broken pavement or other problems with the road.  In slippery conditions, such as snow, ice or wet pavement, much more space is advisable.
  • Lighting condition: at night or if you are looking into reflected sun or glare, you need more space because you will not see things as easily.
  • Traffic condition: as traffic gets heavier, you need to stay aware of much more than in light traffic, this occupies your attention so more space in front buys you more time to react.
  • YOUR condition: if you are tired or otherwise not 100%, leave more space because your reactions may not be as quick.

Introduce the Video:

Spencer McDonald discusses how to reduce the chances of a rear end collision and notes multiple additional benefits of maintaining a safe following distance.  Time interval formula is discussed and demonstrated and the benefits of enhanced vision, when keeping a good following distance, are also discussed.

Practical Challenge:

Today as you drive, count your time interval and see just how much space you are actually leaving.  Make adjustments as necessary and practise re-adjusting pretty soon, you will be able to judge the distance accurately and will only need to check once in a while!

Let’s all have a safe day!

Download a PDF version of this meeting planner HERE!

Friday, 11 July 2014 00:00

SAFETY MEETING PLANNER & AGENDA

Meeting Planner:

  • Prepare in advance to make this meeting effective.  Click HERE for a link to instructions on how to best use this information.
  • Print and read over this entire agenda (or download a PDF version here).
  • Think about how you want to lead the meeting.
  • Is there anything that is specific to your company or operation that you can include to personalize the information?
  • Review the video for this session.
  • Save the link to the video in your ‘Favorites’ folder on your browser for easy access.
  • Open and then minimize the viewer just before the meeting to make the video introduction smooth.

Video Template

START YOUR MEETING!

Opening Statement:

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Summer is finally here!

The kids are out of school, families begin to plan and leave on vacations and a whole new list of challenges presents itself to drivers.

Questions for this Meeting:

Q: What challenges does summertime driving present on and off the job?

Some answers can be:

summer collage

  • Kids are out of school and can be anywhere…they are excited to be out in the sunshine playing and may not take care to look both ways before entering a street.
  • Many more cyclists can be expected.  These include:
    – those little ones just learning and wobbling around with or without training wheels; experienced cyclists touring the countryside loaded with camping gear; racers training for the next event; recreational cyclists on mountain bikes or cruiser.
  • Slow moving recreational vehicles driven by folks who are less than experienced in these larger vehicles;
  • Tourist drivers unfamiliar with roads and possibly driving slow and lost;
  • Pedestrians of every type and description;
  • Tourists, if you are in an area where there are attractions, campgrounds or resorts;
  • Sightseers around downtown landmarks or parks;
  • Folks out for a cool evening stroll;
  • Summertime can create challenges for vehicles also.  So if you are a trip planning, plan to have your vehicle checked.collage 2
  • Excessive heat can affect drivers in negative ways.
  • Can you think of more?

Q: Discuss each challenge and the effect on a driver?

Ask: What are the best ways to manage these challenges?

Discuss

Tailgate Tips:

The first thing that a THINKING DRIVER does is plan for the unexpected.  Keep these challenges in mind and expect them so that you are not surprised.

Children:

Anywhere that there may be children around, slow down and take extra care to think and look ahead.

Anticipate where children may be coming from and cover your brake if you are in doubt at all about where they may move to.

Remember, we all teach our kids to be safe around traffic, but some learn faster than others!

Cyclists:

Dealing with cyclists can be frustrating, particularly if they are slow and in your lane where you don’t have room to pass.

sharetheroad1[1]

Every cyclist has different skill levels and capabilities and a different attitude towards traffic.  When you encounter a cyclist on the road, remember to SHARE THE ROAD responsibly.  They are not permitted to ride on the sidewalks and gravel shoulders are difficult and dangerous for most road bikes; they are required to be on the roadway and its everyone’s responsibility to share.

Take a breath, be patient and wait until you can pass safely.  NEVER crowd a cyclist as you pass.

Recreational Vehicles:

RV traffic Glenn Highway and Chugach mtns

You may be in a hurry to get your destination, but RVers are on a holiday!  They may be less concerned about time and speed.

The driver may not be experienced in this size vehicle.  Watch out particularly for rental RVs, often these drivers have no experience at all!

If you are driving in mountainous areas, you may find that many RVs are underpowered, overloaded and SLOW!  Be patient with these drivers as they are likely going uphill as fast as they can!

If you are the RVer, take every opportunity to pull over if you are holding up traffic and let others by.  This is much safer than waiting for the guy behind you to attempt an unsafe pass.

Tourists:

Maintaining patience behind a lost tourist is challenging but it’s only option.  Give them a break and time to figure out what they are doing.

When you are travelling, check your maps first and use a GPS.  Pull over if you are lost or uncertain to re-orient yourself.  Avoid last minute turns or lane changes.  It’s safer to go around the block or come back if you miss a turn.

Don’t ruin your vacation with an accident!

Pedestrians:

Pay particular attention in summer for pedestrians.

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Scan intersections and make sure that you shoulder check before turning.  In heavily trafficked tourist areas, keep your speed very low.  Be aware that around lakes, beaches and parks, some of the pedestrians may have been drinking and take chances.

Vehicle Preparation:

Check your vehicle to make sure that it’s ready for summer driving.

One of the most common failures is the cooling system.  Check your coolant levels regularly and top up when needed.

If you are towing a trailer, make sure that your vehicle is rated to tow the weight and has the capability to slow and stop it on the downgrades.

Make sure that you secure camping or recreational equipment in the vehicle so that it doesn’t move around or obstruct vision.

Impairment:

imagesCAZOSV6K

Summer is the time for socializing, beach parties, camping, boating, ball games and BBQs.  Any one of these can involve drinking.  Watch out in these areas for drivers who may be impaired and for sure DON’T DRINK & DRIVE!

Prepare for the heat!:

Drinking-water-hot-sun[1]

When overheated, our tolerance for stress goes down and we may anger more easily than normal.  Recognize this and keep cool by using the vehicle air conditioning, drinking lots of fluids and taking regular breaks.

By caring for your body in the heat of summer, you will enjoy the drive more and make better, safer decisions.

Introduce the Video:

Spencer McDonald discusses ways to reduce risk while driving in summer.

Practical Challenge:

hero-coolant[1]

Take the group out and check the fluid levels on vehicles: coolant and washer fluid.  Top up if necessary.

DOWNLOAD A PDF VERSION OF THIS MEETING PLANNER HERE!

Monday, 18 August 2014 00:00

SAFETY MEETING PLANNER AND AGENDA

Meeting Leader:

  • Prepare in advance to make this meeting effective.  Click HERE for a link to instructions on how to best use this information.
  • Print and read over this entire agenda (or download a PDF version here).
  • Think about how you want to lead the meeting.
  • Is there anything that is specific to your company or operation that you can include to personalize the information?
  • Review the video for this session.

Video Template

NOT A SUBSCRIBER YET?  You will see a watermarked sample.  Get the ‘clean’ video for your meeting now by visiting our online store.

Save the link to the video in your ‘Favourites’ folder on your browser for easy access.

Open and then minimize the viewer just before the meeting to make the video introduction smooth.

START YOUR MEETING!

OPENING STATEMENT:

pedestrians-crossing[1]

Pedestrians are the most vulnerable road users.  Every year in the US and Canada, over 5,000 pedestrians are killed in traffic accidents.

QUESTIONS FOR THIS MEETING:

Q: Where do most pedestrian collisions occur, small towns or larger cities?

A: About two-thirds of pedestrian fatalities occur urban areas.

Q: What two days of the year do you think are the worst for pedestrian fatalities?

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A: New Year’s Day and Halloween are the two most deadly days of the year, having the highest number of pedestrian fatalities.

Q: What is the most dangerous time of the day for pedestrians?

A: Pedestrians are more likely to be killed in a crash between 3 am and 6 am or during the weekend on Saturday and Sunday.

Q: Who is more likely to be killed as a pedestrian, men or women, older or younger people?

A: Males have a much higher probability than females to be killed in a crash.

A: The older age group (over 64) has a much greater possibility than other age groups to be killed in a crash.

An elderly woman takes a walk near the A

Q: Does drinking play a role?

A: It’s no surprise that as a pedestrian’s blood alcohol concentration (BAC) increases, the probability of them getting killed in a crash increases.

Q: What impact does lighting play?

A: Pedestrians have a higher probability to be killed in a crash under a dark condition than under other lighter conditions.

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As drivers, we are usually on the lookout for other vehicles and are often surprised by their movements.  Pedestrians can be even more unpredictable and we need to be prepared and watch for them.  It’s up to you to look out for pedestrians and take early action to avoid conflicts.

TAILGATE TIPS:

Remember the 5 Fundamentals and apply them to pedestrian safety.

Think and Look Ahead

5

  • Use your eyes to actively search for pedestrians, especially in urban areas where they are numerous.  Look well ahead, at least 12 to 15 seconds, and move your eyes from sidewalk to sidewalk to make sure that you don’t have a tunnel vision effect and miss seeing a pedestrian.  At night be particularly attentive as many pedestrians unwisely choose dark clothing that makes them difficult to see.
  • Make sure that you shoulder check before turning because pedestrians are easy to miss when they are in your blind spot.

Anticipate Hazards

  • Once you see a pedestrian, anticipate and predict what they MAY do.  And be prepared to respond as needed.
  • When you are stopped for pedestrians, watch for vehicles coming from behind you in other lanes that may not see the walker and honk your horn to alert the pedestrians if you think that the other driver isn’t stopping.  If it’s in the driver’s side lane, and you have time, stick your hand out the window to attract the other driver’s attention.Manage the Risk
  • Avoid stopping mid-block to invite pedestrians to cross.  Other drivers don’t expect this and may either not stop for the pedestrian or hit you from behind.

Keep Your Options Open

  • Be aware of other vehicles around you and your option to change lanes or slow or stop if you need to avoid a pedestrian.
  • Look left and right before entering an intersection to make sure that there are no ‘late running’ pedestrians.
  • Yield to pedestrians in crosswalk and anywhere else that they may be in danger from your vehicle.Yield_for_People_in_Crosswalk_s[1]
  • Stop well back from crosswalks so that you can see pedestrians and have a safety cushion in case you are rear ended and pushed forward.

Manage the Risk

  • If you are in any doubt about a pedestrian and his or her movements, cover the brake and reduce your speed.  Sometimes a pedestrian will be distracted or impaired and step out without looking.
  • If you are able, make eye contact with pedestrians and if you are unsure if they see you or not, tap the horn gently to attract their attention.

Control with Finesse

  • Steer and brake smoothly if you need to avoid a pedestrian.  Jerking the steering wheel or slamming the brakes will only make matters worse if you lose control!

Keep Yourself and Your Family Safe

When on foot and near traffic:

family

  • Teach your kids pedestrian safety from a young age and be a good example for them!
  • Look both ways before crossing.
  • Use the crosswalk.
  • Walk on the left, facing traffic.
  • Wear light coloured clothing.
  • If you walk for exercise or on dark roads, wear a reflective vest or jacket.
  • Stay well off the roadway, particularly at night.
  • If you work near moving vehicles of any type on or off the highway, wear your Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and avoid turning your back on moving vehicles.

INTRODUCE THE VIDEO:

Spencer McDonald discusses how to prevent vehicle incidents involving pedestrians.

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PRACTICAL CHALLENGE:

This week, look for pedestrians and make sure that you yield when required to.  Notice how many close calls there are between vehicles and pedestrians and make sure that you are not one of them.

Wednesday, 17 September 2014 00:00

SAFETY MEETING PLANNER AND AGENDA

Meeting Leader:

  • Prepare in advance to make this meeting effective.  Click HERE for a link to instructions on how to best use this information. circle_check_sticker_final%20copy[1]
  • Thinking Driver ‘Circle Check’ decals available to order for all your corporate vehicles (click here to order decals).  Introduce these decals at the Safety Meeting.
  • Print and read over this entire agenda (or download a PDF version here).
  • Think about how you want to lead the meeting.
  • Is there anything that is specific to your company or operation that you can include to personalize the information?
  • Review the video for this session.

Video Template

NOT A SUBSCRIBER YET?  You will see a watermarked sample.  Get the ‘clean’ video for your meeting now by visiting our online store.

Save the link to the video in your ‘Favourites’ folder on your browser for easy access.

Open and then minimize the viewer just before the meeting to make the video introduction smooth.

START YOUR MEETING!

Opening Statement:

circle_check_sticker_final%20copy[1]

How often to you walk around your vehicle before moving it?  A circle check is mandatory before putting your vehicle into service at the beginning of the day and any time before backing up if you have been parked and this is the first motion you are making.

The Questions for this Meeting:

Q: Why is a walk around or circle check a good idea?  There are many reasons but how many can we identify?

Answers Include:

  • Walking around and checking vehicle condition can identify vehicle defects and safety concerns before you begin driving; in particular, the tire condition.
  • A circle check gives you the opportunity to check the operation of lights and signals.broken tail light
  • If you are backing up (or moving forward in a vehicle with restricted visibility to the front), a circle check will allow you to notice obstructions or hazards in your immediate area that may cause a conflict when you begin moving.

Q: What is your excuse for not doing this quick and important safety check?

Discuss answers.

Tailgate Tips:

Meeting Leader: Check company policy and/or handbook to ensure that you adhere to policy otherwise use the suggestions below.

When you do your circle check, before the start of your day or shift, us a system.  It could be:

  • Unlock and start the vehicle.
  • Turn on headlights and left turn signal.
  • Begin by walking clockwise around the vehicle and check:
    • Each tire as you pass it for damage, cuts or obvious problems including low pressure.
    • Headlights, taillights and turn signal operation.
    • Glass and mirror cleanliness and condition.
    • Look for damage on any part of the vehicle and report it if found BEFORE driving.
    • After arriving back at the driver’s door, click your headlights to high beam, change the turn signal to right signal and walk to the back and front to check the headlight high beams and right signal.
    • If you have backed in near a wall or fence, check your own brake lights by looking for the reflection when you press the pedal, otherwise get someone to check when you apply the brake.bicycle
  • And most important, if your vehicle is in the driveway at home or where there are children around, check for kids playing around the vehicle.  Every year in North America, over 200 children are killed when BACKED OVER in their own driveway by parents, relatives or neighbours.

Introduce the Video:

Spencer McDonald discusses the importance of walking around your vehicle to check for hazards before moving it.

Practical Challenge:

Make September CIRCLE CHECK MONTH and make a concerted effort to circle check.  Agree as a group to watch each other and remind those that forget.  Agree to not take offence if you get reminded.

Get the boss and office staff involved too!

Tuesday, 14 October 2014 00:00

SAFETY MEETING PLANNER AND AGENDA

Meeting Leader:
• Prepare in advance to make this meeting effective. Click HERE for a link to instructions on how to best use this information.
• Print and read over this entire agenda (or download a PDF version here).
• Think about how you want to lead the meeting.
• Is there anything that is specific to your company or operation that you can include to personalize the information?
• Review the video for this session.

Video Template

NOT A SUBSCRIBER YET? You will see a watermarked sample. Get the ‘clean’ video for your meeting now by clicking here to get the order form or visit our online store.

Save the link to the video in your ‘Favourites’ folder on your browser for easy access.

Open and then minimize the viewer just before the meeting to make the video introduction smooth.

START YOUR MEETING!

Opening Statement:

winter-driving[1]

You hear it on the radio traffic report whenever the weather gets bad.  Accidents all over the place and everyone is blaming the weather!  Weather is rarely the cause of an accident or incident.  Instead, it’s usually a driver who doesn’t adjust his or her driving to accommodate the weather.

The Questions for this Meeting:

Q: What are the kinds of bad weather that we face in this area and what types of challenges do they present?

Answers could be:

  • Snow – causes traction problems and often steering problems if there is accumulation on the road.
  • Ice – causes traction and control problems.  Black ice can be particularly hazardous because it doesn’t appear on the road.imagesCAF8UE72
  • Heavy Rain and Flooding – can cause visibility problems and traction issues if it pools on the road.  This situation can result in hydroplaning where the vehicle tires rise onto a cushion of water and lose contact with the road.
  • Blowing Snow – can create whiteout conditions that are extremely dangerous.
  • How many more can we identify?

Q: Why does too much speed cause problems in all of these (and other) extreme weather conditions?

Answers:

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  • As speed increases under any conditions, the energy stored by the vehicle movement also increases and needs to be somehow absorbed or dissipated enough to permit steering and braking on whatever road surface you are on regardless of the traction conditions.  If traction conditions are poor and you are going too fast to stop or steer, you will end up out of control; either briefly until your speed comes down enough to regain traction, or long enough to crash.  That’s just a fact.  You can’t change the laws of physics, even if you are an excellent driver.
  • A human being takes between 1/2 and 1 second to react to something when driving, and even more time to move the right foot to the brake pedal if stopping or braking is necessary.  If your speed is too great in conditions where you can’t see well ahead, you will be overdriving your vision and will be unable to react fast enough to avoid problems.  Again, just a fact of nature.
  • Combine slippery surfaces and poor visibility with too much speed and you have a recipe for disaster.

Tailgate Tips:

DriveForConditions[1]

  • When you are driving under any condition, regularly assess your speed and adjust it as necessary to ensure that you are able to slow or stop to avoid a hazard.
  • When you know that conditions are poor and you must drive anyway, leave early or call ahead to notify people that you may be late and take it slower.
  • Choose the right lane on multilane roadways and just stay there unless traffic is moving impossibly slow.  The guys in the fast lane on slippery roads are almost always going too fast to effectively control the vehicle in any situation except straight line, ‘no problem’ driving.
  • Make sure that your lights are clean and are giving you the best possible light and drive at a speed that allows you to stop in the distance that you can see.

Introduce the Video:

Spencer McDonald discusses the importance of adjusting your driving to accommodate current weather conditions.

Practical Challenge:

auto-insurance-good-driver[1]

For the next week make a conscious effort to check your speed regularly in good and bad conditions and try out driving a bit slower; especially in poorer conditions.

If you are a ‘left lane just go as fast as the fastest traffic’ kind of person, try out the right lane for a change and hang out with the ones going a little slower.  It’s safer, and you may find that it is less irritating that you imagine when you choose it!

Think about how important it is for you to hurry and take chances in poor conditions.  Ask yourself: is it worth investing a couple more minutes to ensure that I get home safe to my family?

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